History fact: it happened on August 11 in Paris

Published by Manon C. · Published on 11 August 2021 at 00h18
On August 11, 1999 in Paris and everywhere else in France, the Moon has fully eclipsed the Sun for a bit under 3 minutes. This has been last total eclipse of the 20th century, and the second millennium.

It happened on August 11 in Paris and everywhere else in France, and even on a major part of the Asian continent. On August 11, 1999, at lunchtime, the Moon has fully eclipsed the Sun. This was the last total eclipse of the 20th century and the second millennium.

In the middle of summer, millions of curious people have gathered outside, on several kilometers from South of Nova Scotia to the Bay of Bengal to enjoy the Sun fully obscured by the Moon and attend this historical event. In France, the full strip of the Moon’s shadow covered Normandy to Alsace and the North of Paris.

Eyes up to the sky and equipped with the famous “eclipse-special” protective glasses, enabling to admire eclipse without burning one’s eyes, the French have been able to enjoy this extraordinary event for a bit less than 3 minutes. But those who still remember it: that day, the weather was rather capricious and clouds joined it, which did not make things easy.

Anyway! For a few minutes hanging in time, the French shivered – because of the 3-degree drop in temperature in the middle of summer but the shadow was total and with pleasure! The Dark Sun came out, framed by Mercure and Venus on each side, while some animals, sure this was night, kept quiet and went to sleep.

The eclipse was total and one of the most followed in History. The previous total eclipse of the Sun landed on February 15, 1961 in France. And for the next one visible from France, you have to wait until September 3…2081!

And what about? Where were you that day?

Practical information

Location

Paris
75 Paris

More informations
Crédits photo : Giuseppe Donatiello

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