Covid: a new antibody therapy developed by Spiklmm under rolling review

Published by Laurent P. · Updated on 15 September 2021 at 11h18 · Published on 13 September 2021 at 10h27
Is a new Covid therapy based on monoclonal antibodies soon to be reviewed? This is what infectious disease specialist and member of Spiklmm biotech administration board Karine Lacombe has explained. The very laboratory is developing this therapy. Clinical trials are expected to start from the beginning of 2022.

The search for a Covid therapy goes on… After Clofoctol – reviewed by Lille Institut Pasteur and that announced a few days ago they have found their first volunteer for the phase two of the clinical trials – now, another therapy with an undetermined name – developed by French biotech Spiklmm, created by Truffle Capital and the Institut Pasteur – is widely talked about. A therapy based on monoclonal antibodies promoted by infectious disease specialist and member of Spiklmm biotech administration board Karine Lacombe on BFM Business.

A preventive drug, coming in as a subcutaneous injection, to take ahead of time and likely to complete the vaccine especially in people who cannot get vaccinated because of their health. “Monoclonal antibodies really act as a vaccine complement or for people who do not respond to the vaccine”, Lacombe explains. She continues explaining this therapy comes just when needed: “The first monoclonal antibodies have been removed from the market, because their spectrum of action is too narrow. The interest of the one developed by Spiklmm is it has a very broad spectrum of action, with very low concentrations”, she adds. The spectrum of action is said to last six months.

The effectiveness has been proven in vitro so far, for clinical trials likely to start from the beginning of 2022: “We hope to launch in-human tests from early 2022, for issuance in the coming months”, the infectious disease specialist specifies. She continues: “we hope it will be able to stop any kind of virus, even those that will develop mutations we do not know yet”. In vivo trials on mice and hamster are going on.

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